Skip to main content

Detail

Michael Jantsch
Dr. Michael JantschHead of Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology

Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology (Division of Cell and Developmental Biology)
Position: Professor

T +43 1 40106 37510
michael.jantsch@meduniwien.ac.at

Further Information

Keywords

Cell Biology; Muscle, Smooth, Vascular; RNA, Double-Stranded; RNA, Messenger; Transcriptome

Research group(s)

  • Epitranscriptomics

Research interests

We study the impact of epitranscriptomic changes and RNA-modifications on gene expression and gene egulation using transgenic mice and tissue culture cells. A key focus is currently laid on the regulation of the cytoskeletal protein Filamin A by RNA modification. Here we study the role of Filamin on smooth muslce contraction. Another research focus aims at deciphering the way how nucleic acids are recognized by the immune system depending on their modification state.

Techniques, methods & infrastructure

We use mice as a model to study the impact of transciptomic changes. Next generation sequencing, RNA analysis, and state-of-the-art cell biology and imaging are part of our research repertoire which we blend with standard molecular biological techniques.

A special focus lies on methods to study smooth muscle cells and their contractile behavior.

Also, using RNA Seq analysis we aim at understanding transcriptomic changes in the absence of RNA editing that may trigger an inflammatory response. This is supported by mouse genetics and cell biological model systems.

Grants

  • Impact of RNA editing on splicing (2014)
    Source of Funding: FWF (Austrian Science Fund), Stand-Alone Projects
    Principal Investigator
  • Regulation of adenosine deamination type RNA-editing by mRNA splicing (2014)
    Source of Funding: FWF (Austrian Science Fund), Stand-Alone Projects
    Principal Investigator
  • RNA regulation of the transcriptome (2010)
    Source of Funding: FWF (Austrian Science Fund), Special Research Programmes (SFB43)
    Principal Investigator

Selected publications

  1. Vesely, C. et al., 2014. ADAR2 induces reproducible changes in sequence and abundance of mature microRNAs in the mouse brain. Nucleic Acids Research, 42(19), pp.12155-12168. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gku844.
  2. Barraud, P. et al., 2014. A bimodular nuclear localization signal assembled via an extended double-stranded RNA-binding domain acts as an RNA-sensing signal for transportin 1. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(18), pp.E1852-E1861. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1323698111.
  3. Tajaddod, M. et al., 2016. Transcriptome-wide effects of inverted SINEs on gene expression and their impact on RNA polymerase II activity. Genome Biology, 17(1). Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-016-1083-0.
  4. Licht, K. et al., 2016. Adenosine to Inosine editing frequency controlled by splicing efficiency. Nucleic Acids Research, p.gkw325. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkw325.
  5. Mannion, N.M. et al., 2014. The RNA-Editing Enzyme ADAR1 Controls Innate Immune Responses to RNA. Cell Reports, 9(4), pp.1482-1494. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.10.041.