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The fight against cancer: more investment, local care and worldwide structural measures needed

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(Vienna, 14 June 2018) Cancer is a burden to those affected by it and a growing challenge to the political sector. In 2017, WHO therefore issued an international resolution to safeguard the quality of cancer treatment, and access to it, in every country in the world. The European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) has now put forward an innovative concept for implementing this resolution. Experts are calling for more investment in cancer prevention, early detection and infrastructure, guaranteed access to adequate cancer treatment and the creation and expansion of international networks in the areas of oncologic professionals and joint research.  

The Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC) of MedUni Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, represented by its Head, Christoph Zielinski, and by Gerald Prager, Head of the Colorectal Cancer Unit (CCC-CRC) and the precision medicine platform (Platform for Molecular Diagnostics and Treatment in Oncology) of the CCC, are taking a leading role in the development of this expert paper. The paper was recently published in ESMO Open.

Globally, around 8.8 million people a year die from cancer. This means that every year cancer claims more victims than HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Experts estimate that the number of cancer cases will double by 2035.

In order to drive forward implementation of the WHO resolution, the ESMO, as the only international organisation currently in this area of healthcare, has now put forward an implementation concept. This makes provision for a series of concrete measures and recommendations to national health authorities.

Four main themes
The concept addresses four main themes:
1)    The financial aspects of cancer diagnosis and treatment: for example, the authors recommend that countries invest in cancer prevention and early detection.

2)    Access to treatment from a geographic, financial and socio-cultural perspective. MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital's CCC is already implementing some aspects of this point via its "Community Oncology" programme. By providing telemedicine offerings and consultancy services, this allows patients to be cared for close to their homes.

3)    The establishment and safeguarding of fundamental services, such as providing awareness programmes, instruments for evaluating the therapeutic benefit of drugs and the introduction of cancer registers.

4)    Guaranteeing the highest possible quality of treatment: this primarily concerns personnel management, advanced training measures and joint international research initiatives.

The concept is intended as an instrument and guideline to be used by representatives of health authorities in planning their future strategies.

Says Prager: "The Cancer Resolution provides a guideline for all countries, be they rich or poor, for what they can do, within the means available to them, to ensure that their populations receive the best possible care. This even applies to countries such as Austria. For example, people who live in geographically remote areas should not receive a lower standard of care than patients in urban centres."

Service: "Global cancer control: responding to the growing burden, rising costs and inequalities in access."
Prager GW, Braga S, Bystricky B, Qvortrup C, Criscitiello C, Esin E, Sonke GS, Martínez GA, Frenel JS, Karamouzis M, Strijbos M, Yazici O, Bossi P, Banerjee S, Troiani T, Eniu A, Ciardiello F, Tabernero J, Zielinski CC, Casali PG, Cardoso F, Douillard JY, Jezdic S, McGregor K, Bricalli G, Vyas M, Ilbawi A.
ESMO Open. 2018 Feb 2;3(2):e000285. doi: 10.1136/esmoopen-2017-000285. eCollection 2018.