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Arthur Schüller, born 28 December 1874: "Founder of Neuroradiology"

Film commemorates life and work of scientist expelled from Vienna by the Nazis
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(Vienna, 28 December 2020) 146 years ago today, Arthur Schüller (Schuller) was born on 28 December 1874. Due to his scientific achievements at the medical faculty of the University of Vienna, he is regarded as the "Founder of Neuroradiology". He published numerous works on diagnostic radiology for brain diseases and cranial defects. Expelled by the Nazis, Schüller spent the last years of his life in Australia. A film commemorates the life and work of this medical pioneer.

Arthur Schüller was born in Brno in the Czech Republic. He studied medicine at the medical faculty of the University of Vienna, graduating in 1899 "sub auspiciis imperatoris" to become a doctor of general medicine. In 1907, he qualified as a university lecturer in neurology and psychiatry (habilitation treatise: "Diagnostic radiology for diseases of the head") and from then on taught as a private lecturer. In 1914, he was awarded the title of extraordinary professor of neurological and psychological diseases and was given a university teaching position to teach cranial radiology. From 1908 onwards, he also worked as Director of the neurology department of the Franz-Joseph-Ambulatorium in Vienna and in the central radiology laboratory of the General Hospital (AKH) under Guido Holzknecht.

Arthur Schüller it is regarded as the "Founder of Neuroradiology". He published numerous works on diagnostic radiology for brain diseases and cranial defects. Inter alia, Hand-Schüller-Christian disease is named after him. Schüller was the first person to carry out cisternography in 1936.

Under National Socialism, Schüller was persecuted on racist grounds, his venia legendi was revoked and he was stripped of his office on 22 April 1938 and expelled from the University of Vienna.

He and his wife emigrated to Melbourne in Australia. His two sons perished in Auschwitz extermination camp in Poland. In Australia, Schüller continued to work as a radiologist. He died on 31 October 1957.

A film, produced by Arthur Schüller's great-nephew Andrew Schuller, portrays Schüller's private and professional life journey.

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