Skip to main content

Detail

Francesco Moscato
Assoc. Prof. Dipl.-Ing. Francesco Moscato, PhD

Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering
Position: Associate Professor

ORCID: 0000-0003-0279-6615
T +43 1 40400 39830
francesco.moscato@meduniwien.ac.at

Keywords

Artificial Intelligence; Artificial Organs; Biomedical Engineering; Cardiovascular System; Medical 3D-Printing; Models, Cardiovascular; Pattern Recognition, Automated; Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted

Research group(s)

Research interests

My research focuses on two main areas: medical 3d-printing and cardiovascular bioengineering. On the one hand, my research adresses the investigation of how 3d-printing could improve surgical and interventional procedures, medical device prototyping, tissue engineering and medical education. On the other hand, my efforts are devoted towards research and development of methods and devices to improve diagnostics and provide support to a range of cardiovascular pathologies.

Techniques, methods & infrastructure

Additive manufacruting (aka 3d-printing), mechanical and hemodynamic in-vitro and ex-vivo test setups, mathematical modeling, system identification and control, biosignal processing/machine learning.

Grants

Selected publications

  1. Russo, Marco, et al., 2020. Advanced three-dimensionally engineered simulation model for aortic valve and proximal aorta procedures. Interact CardioVasc Thorac Surg, 30(6):887–895.
  2. Grabska, Joanna, et al., 2020. Early Detection of Pump Thrombosis in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Device. ASAIO J, 66(4):348-354.
  3. Gross, Christoph, et al., 2019. LVAD Pump Flow Does Not Adequately Increase With Exercise. Artificial Organs, 43(3):222-228.
  4. Granegger, Marcus, et al., 2016. Continuous Monitoring of Aortic Valve Opening in Rotary Blood Pump Patients. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 63(6):1201-1207.
  5. Moscato, Francesco, et al., 2013. Use of continuous flow ventricular assist devices in patients with heart failure and a normal ejection fraction: A computer-simulation study. The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 145(5):1352-1358.